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We have a trusted place at the heart of communities around Australia.

“As trusted scientific professionals, veterinarians work day in and day out with animals, caring passionately about their welfare and the people who love and need them. Vets for Climate Action communicates the urgency of the climate crisis and its impacts on wildlife, livestock and pets.” 

- Jeannet Kessel Chair of the Board

We are scientists at heart. We understand the science and seek to share it wherever possible.

People are more open to hearing information from trusted professionals. Those with scientific knowledge, keen communication skills and the trust of their community earned through service. Vets, vet nurses and other members of our industry are those unique individuals; trusted advisors at the heart of their suburbs and towns, caring for animals and giving out expert advice. 

This is more than an opportunity, it’s our responsibility.

We know Australians have a deep connection with their pets, livestock and wildlife. But so do we. We care passionately about the welfare of animals, and the people who love them. Our One Health approach tells us that animals, environment and people are all connected and that climate change threatens animals, habitats and our way of life. 

That is why climate action is our cause and we must champion it.


Why we care

Heat stress
Heat stress
Our supporters see countless cases of heat stress and dehydration in pets, livestock and wildlife.
Species extinction
Species extinction
Under business as usual CO2 emissions scenarios, wildlife extinction rates of between 16% to 89% have been predicted.
Water scarcity
Water scarcity
As well as rising temperatures, the southern half of Australia is experiencing long-term reductions in rainfall.
One health
One health
Climate change threatens our One Health relationship with Australia's animals.
Natural disasters
Natural disasters
Increased frequency and severtity of natural disasters such as cyclones, bushfires, floods and droughts cause untold distress to the animlas we love.
Our reefs are disappearing
Our reefs are disappearing
Climate change presents the single biggest threat to the continued existence of the Great Barrier Reef.
Agricultural productivity and viability
Agricultural productivity and viability
Climate change is changing long term weather patterns that farmers and their animals rely upon.
Epidemiology
Epidemiology
Climate change will be a factor in the epidemiology of vector-borne and infectious diseases, affecting human and animal health.